The Planner

The first step in my opinion to becoming organized is having a place where you can store everything you’re going to need for your day-to-day activities. Instead of relying on your memory for appointments and assignments due, or a phone number, keep track of it in a planner. It frees your mind up for remembering other things.

There are many methods of keeping a planner, but for now, I’d like to focus on what I use: a Moleskine.

I started using a Moleskine Daily Notebook in August of 2008 and have yet to find any other planner layout that works for me as well as the Moleskine. That’s the key to having and maintaining a planner. You need to use what works for you, and very often the only way to figure out what works for you is through trial and error. I’ve tried at least four or five different planner layouts since high school until I found Moleskine’s Daily Notebook.

The Moleskine Daily Notebook has the date, and space to write your appointments/deadlines on the left, and a lined sheet of paper on the right, giving you plenty of room to write extra notes.

I’ve gone as far as to color coordinate mine, writing down certain notes in certain ink colors. I’ve taken a picture of what my planner looks like so far this week, and pointed out the color coordination I use to identify different parts of my life.

I’ve used this color coordination system for the past few months, and it’s been a great success. When I’m looking for something specific, my eyes focus on one color, making it easier to find what I’m looking for.

If you notice on Tuesday and Wednesday, I’ve written on the right side of the date, but not the left. Typically, when an assignment is given to me, I write it down that day, on the left side. On the day that it is due, I write it on the right side. This method helps me keep track of how long I’ve had to complete an assignments, which is important when determining the order in which I’ll complete tasks.

February 17, 2010 at 1:52 am 1 comment

The need to change

I used to thrive on being “stressed-out.” An adjective used most often to describe my lifestyle is busy.

My senior year of high school I was busy. I developed two independent studies for myself in addition to taking classes that were required to graduate. I was the vice president of a club I developed with my best friend, as well as the editor-in-chief of the school’s newspaper. To make things even more interesting, I managed to hold down two jobs most of the year and be an active member of my church’s youth group. I balanced this all with a healthy dose of being lazy and putting social priorities in front of academic ones. It was chaotic. I was never bored, and always had somewhere to go or be, and that’s how I liked it.

At that point in my life, it was easy to slack off, hand in papers late and take down all of my notes for class in one notebook. I could easily pull an all-nighter to finish a paper, and design the poster for the church car wash that Saturday while not paying attention in English. For someone who is easily distracted, this worked. (More to come in the future on why I think organization is a huge task for me, and others with similar minds.)

Needless to say, the transition to college hit me like a ton of bricks. I had to be on top of tests and papers and doing outside work for class. I found out slowly that if I didn’t feel like going to class one day, I could have done something as silly as miss learning about two hundred years of history in one hour, and that the professor was not going to review that material two days later, because we had more to learn. Suddenly, the chaotic lifestyle started to wear me down. Advanced classes and more work lead to a desire for thirty hours in the day just so I could accomplish more. I wasn’t happy at all, because I wasn’t succeeding in college; I was floundering

Something needed to change, and I knew college wasn’t going to be a little less rigorous because I asked it to be. I would need to change and adapt myself to be a successful college student. I’d love to say that it was as easy as pushing a big red button, but going from  the chaotic to organized is a constant project, which takes time and effort every day until it finally becomes habit.

I’ve developed little tools for myself to help me stay on track which I will be blogging about throughout the week. For now, I’ve posted some links under the ‘Links’ section to help someone get started. Later on I’ll post about my experience with advice and tools for those websites.

February 15, 2010 at 3:40 am Leave a comment

Why?

Why is the question I’ve been hearing a lot lately. Why are you creating a blog about organization? Why is being organized so important? Why do you color-coordinate your planner? Why are you constantly writing yourself reminders? Why bother?

I realized this semester that my own recent initiative to take control of my life all boiled down to one thing: being organized. How can I get things done if I don’t know what I have to do? How can I write a paper if I don’t have the guideline sheet? How do I know what stories are going in the newspaper this week, if I don’t have them written down?

Anais Nin once said, “Life is a process of becoming, a combination of states we have to go through. Where people fail is that they wish to elect a state and remain in it. This is a kind of death.”

When I finally decided I needed to start becoming organized, I realized that organization in all forms is something that did not just come naturally to me. It’s something I had to work for it continuously.

I am in no way claiming to be an expert. All I am is someone who is in the process of becoming organized, wanting to share my journey of the states I am going through. I like to think of it as lending a hand to the less organized. Giving personal testimony to what works for me and what doesn’t, helpful hints, tricks and tips, and why becoming organized was so important to me.

The above picture is the full size version of what I used for my header. It contains some items that I couldn’t become organized without, which I feel gives the blog a more personal feel. More on those items to come in the future!

February 15, 2010 at 3:13 am Leave a comment

Newer Posts


“Becoming Organized” in a nutshell.

Anais Nin once said, “Life is a process of becoming, a combination of states we have to go through. Where people fail is that they wish to elect a state and remain in it. This is a kind of death.”

All I am is someone who is in the process of becoming organized, wanting to share my journey of the states I am going through. I like to think of it as lending a hand to the less organized. Giving personal testimony to what works for me and what doesn’t, helpful hints, tricks and tips, and why becoming organized was so important to me.

August 2017
M T W T F S S
« May    
 123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
28293031  

Archives